Australia news live: Sarah Hanson-Young condemns ‘race to the bottom’ reaction to high court indefinite detention ruling | Australia news – Freedom Voice


‘Race to the bottom’: Greens criticise reaction to high court ruling on indefinite detention

Greens senator Sarah Hanson-Young has criticised the government’s reaction to the high court’s ruling on indefinite immigration detention and the tone of debate about the issue this week.

The Albanese government will enact preventive detention laws to redetain people released as a result of the court ruling on indefinite immigration detention. The court appeared to endorse the legality of such a regime for non-citizens convicted of serious crimes

Hanson-Young has told the ABC’s Insider’s program the Greens will not support such a scheme.

We are not, in any way, interested with playing footsies with the Labor party under the table on this at all.

There is a race to the bottom here. This is all about making refugees and migrants a group in our community that people are afraid of.

I’ve debated immigration policy in this country for a long time and it’s Groundhog Day. It’s revolting. I think it’s dangerous.

Key events

Victoria Police officers go on strike for better pay, target speed camera revenue

Thousands of Victoria Police officers are trying to reduce state government revenue from high-yield speed cameras as part of industrial action sparked by an ongoing pay dispute.

A sign of protest that reads 'Wanted: fair pay' is written on a police car during a Victorian police press conference about police pay.
Victorian police officers have begun strike action after a five-month pay negotiation with the state government. Photograph: Diego Fedele/AAP

Nearly 18,000 officers across the state began strike action at 7am after 99% of Police Association members who participated in a recent ballot voted to take industrial action.

The union and the police force have been locked in five months of negotiation about a new enterprise agreement for a four per cent pay rise and better working conditions, such as nine-hour shifts.

Union secretary Wayne Gatt said the state’s police officers were overworked and undervalued.

If the government wants to attack the bottom lines of my members’ household, we’ll attack theirs, by placing police cars beside the highest-yielding speed cameras in the state to warn motorists to slow down before they are forced to contribute to the state’s revenue.

Members will also be telling the government and the community how they’re feeling, by scrawling messages on police vehicle windows about the challenges of the job they do and why they deserve to be paid for it.

– AAP

Learner driver, 33, charged after officers injured during pursuit

A learner driver has been charged after two police officers were injured when he allegedly tried to avoid being pulled over, AAP reports.

Around 8.30pm on Saturday, police officers tried to stop a silver Audi sedan in Gladesville on Sydney’s lower north shore.

The car allegedly failed to stop, triggering a police pursuit which ended due to safety concerns as the Audi crashed into another car in Hunters Hill.

Police say the driver, a 33-year-old man, reversed into two approaching police officers before crashing into a unit complex.

The two male officers were taken to hospital and are in a stable condition.

The driver was arrested and charged with multiple offences including assaulting a police officer, hindering or resisting a police officer, not stopping in a police pursuit and being an unaccompanied learner.

He was refused bail and will face Parramatta Local Court on Sunday.

Greens senator targets major supermarket chains ahead of inquiry

Greens senator Nick McKim is speaking about allegations of price gouging by Australia’s major supermarkets in a cost of living crisis.

The supermarkets will face fresh scrutiny from a Senate inquiry that will investigate their market power and pricing decisions, amid concerns they have profiteered during an inflationary period.

The Greens have secured cross-party support to set up the inquiry, which will examine the effect of market concentration on food prices and the pattern of pricing strategies employed by the major chains, Coles and Woolworths.

A hand holds an apple picked from rows of apples in a supermarket.
Supermarket prices for many goods appear to be rising much faster than inflation, the Greens say. Photograph: Ellen Smith/The Guardian

Speaking to ABC News Breakfast this morning, McKim was asked what evidence supports allegations the supermarkets are ramping up prices.

The evidence is simply prima facie, that when you look at the food prices, they appear, in many, many cases across a range of foods and a range of groceries, to have increased far ahead of inflation.

We want to use this inquiry to examine the price setting practices of Coles and Woolworths. We want to use this inquiry to deliver greater transparency around the supply side. In other words, how and how much they pay for the goods and services, the goods that they then sell to Australians.

Will the RBA be ‘the Grinch of Christmas’ and increase rates?

Not according to four in five economists and experts, who believe the central bank’s board will keep rates on hold when it meets on Tuesday.

The Reserve Bank opted to lift interest rates another 25 basis points in November to 4.35 per cent after leaving rates on hold for several months.

The economists and experts surveyed by comparison site Finder say the cash rate will likely be left unchanged on Tuesday, although nearly half are tipping another increase in coming months.

Moody’s Analytics economist Harry Murphy Cruise says the lower-than-expected October inflation data, showing a moderation to 4.9 per cent from 5.6 per cent in September, underpins the case for interest rates to remain unchanged in December:

Combined with the monthly fall in retail sales through October, it is clear that higher interest rates are quelling demand and, by extension, inflation.

That should be enough to save the Reserve Bank board from having to be the Grinch of Christmas when it meets next week.

– AAP

SES receives 200 calls for help in NSW overnight

Heavy rain pelted parts of Sydney, including hail in Parramatta and Eastwood, sparking 200 calls for help to the NSW State Emergency Service on Saturday night.

At about 7.30pm on Saturday the Bureau of Meteorology issued a severe weather warning for heavy rainfall, damaging winds and large hailstones in parts of NSW.

Stormy weather in Sydney this weekend has felled trees and damaged roofs.
Stormy weather in Sydney this weekend has felled trees and damaged roofs. Photograph: Dean Lewins/AAP

The warning has since been cancelled, but Sydney faces a high chance of showers on Sunday afternoon and evening and possibly a thunderstorm.

A lingering low-pressure trough has brought showers and thunderstorms to eastern and southern areas, causing rivers to flood, with some people needing to be rescued.

The SES has received more than 900 requests for help since the beginning of the storm and rain event on Wednesday, with about 700 of those calls relating to fallen trees.

– AAP

‘Race to the bottom’: Greens criticise reaction to high court ruling on indefinite detention

Greens senator Sarah Hanson-Young has criticised the government’s reaction to the high court’s ruling on indefinite immigration detention and the tone of debate about the issue this week.

The Albanese government will enact preventive detention laws to redetain people released as a result of the court ruling on indefinite immigration detention. The court appeared to endorse the legality of such a regime for non-citizens convicted of serious crimes

Hanson-Young has told the ABC’s Insider’s program the Greens will not support such a scheme.

We are not, in any way, interested with playing footsies with the Labor party under the table on this at all.

There is a race to the bottom here. This is all about making refugees and migrants a group in our community that people are afraid of.

I’ve debated immigration policy in this country for a long time and it’s Groundhog Day. It’s revolting. I think it’s dangerous.

AFP warns extremists are recruiting young Australians online

The Australian Federal Police is warning parents and guardians that extremists are attempting to recruit young people through popular chat and online forums, including gaming platforms.

In a statement, the force says that over the past 12 months, it has noticed “an increase in young people being investigated”. It says “some extremists (are) creating their own platforms to disseminate propaganda, network, recruit and generate funds online”.

The AFP assistant commissioner, Krissy Barrett, is urging parents to be mindful of their children’s online interactions over the holiday period. It also says it is aware of some extremists releasing games that “are just a trojan horse to promote their worldview, blurring the reality of young users with the aim to radicalise them”.

Here’s more of the statement:

With more than 3.22 bn active gamers online around the world, these extremists are attempting to target a significant part of the global population to spread their views and propaganda with the aim of recruiting young people across popular platforms and games with the aim of encouraging them to adopt an extremist or radicalised view.

These extremist groups and individuals are using these gaming and online platforms as a mode to transmit violent material and propaganda, across a range of extremist ideologies.

Coalition calls on government to ‘release all information’ after high court ruling

Daniel Hurst

Daniel Hurst

On Sky News, the Coalition’s Dan Tehan was asked to back up the claim that the high court ruling on indefinite detention required the release of only one detainee.

The interviewer, Andrew Clennell, noted the federal court had already ordered the release of others on the basis of the decision. See Paul Karp‘s news wrap on the high court’s reasons here.

Tehan, the shadow immigration minister, responded by accusing the government of a lack of transparency, and used the line that the government had “serious questions” to answer:

What we are asking of the government is to release all the information so that we know all the detainees they did release had to be released.

Tehan was asked about renewed speculation about his friend, former treasurer Josh Frydenberg, weighing up a return to politics. Frydenberg was defeated by independent candidate Monique Ryan in the Melbourne seat of Kooyong at the 2022 election. Tehan said:

Well, as Peter Dutton, and myself and all our colleagues have said we’d love to have Josh back in the parliament. I think the people of Kooyong would love to have him back in the parliament. But he made it quite clear a couple of months ago that he’s very determined for the moment on his private sector career.

I wish him well in that and, hopefully, in the years to come he might change his mind and look to re-enter the fray, but I think at this stage he’s very comfortable in his private sector role.

Rain eases but flood risk remains for some communities

Eastern states continue to face major threats from floods and thunderstorms as an almost week-long deluge is finally tipped to ease.

Persistent heavy rain that has drenched parts of south eastern Australia over the past week should soon ease.
Persistent heavy rain that has drenched parts of south eastern Australia over the past week should soon ease. Photograph: Diego Fedele/AAP

A lingering low-pressure trough has brought showers and thunderstorms to eastern and southern areas, causing rivers to flood and some residents requiring rescue. The trough is expected to move offshore late on Sunday and into Monday, bringing relief.

Scattered showers and isolated thunderstorms across the NSW-Victorian border area are expected to ease and move eastwards throughout the day, with heavy falls possible for Gippsland during the morning.

Flood warnings for Victoria’s Thomson and Avon rivers have been downgraded, however moderate renewed rises were possible with further rainfall.

– AAP.

Daniel Hurst

Daniel Hurst

Labor defends attack on Dutton after Coalition demands apology

The agriculture minister, Murray Watt, has defended the government’s language about Peter Dutton and asked whether the opposition leader is “about to appoint himself as the chief censor of Australia”.

Watt and the shadow immigration minister, Dan Tehan, were both on Sky News this morning and were asked about the political storm in the wake of the high court ruling against indefinite detention.

The Coalition has demanded an apology from the government including over comments by the home affairs minister, Clare O’Neil, in parliament last week. In question time, she argued the opposition “tried to support paedophiles over children” by voting against a bill she said would “stop paedophiles standing in front of schools”. O’Neil withdrew the comment but stood by the assertion.

Watt told Sky News that had has “basically used exactly the same language in relation to (Queensland premier) Annastacia Palaszczuk and he’s done the same thing in relation to Anthony Albanese that he’s now crying about”. Watt said:

Politics is a rough and tumble game and people have got to be accountable for how they vote. And the truth is that Peter Dutton and the opposition voted against laws that we introduced that sought, for instance, to stop convicted pedophiles from being near school grounds. You’ve got to be accountable for how you vote.

And as I say, the language that has been used to describe those actions is no different from what Peter Dutton himself has used. I mean, is Peter Dutton about to appoint himself as the chief censor of Australia and say what language can and can’t be used and then go and disobey those rules? That’s what seems to be happening here.

Tehan said a “more respectful parliament” was “just another broken promise by the prime minister”.

Australia backs COP28 renewables, energy efficiency vow

Now for some more detail on Australia – along with 118 nations – signing a pledge at the COP28 climate summit to triple global renewable energy capacity by 2030.

The pledge was signed in the United Arab Emirates at an annual United Nations climate meeting on Sunday.

It is an undertaking from nations to aim to double energy efficiency and triple renewable energy capacity within six years – something pledged in September by members of the G20.

In a statement, climate change minister Chris Bowen said for emissions to go down around the world, a big international push was needed.

“We know that renewables are the cleanest and cheapest form of energy – and that energy efficiency can also help drive down bills and emissions,”

Australia has the highest penetration of rooftop solar in the world and has a plan to get to 82 per cent renewables by 2030 to deliver cleaner, cheaper and more reliable energy.

Australia has the resources and the smarts to help supply the world with clean energy technologies to drive down those emissions while spurring new Australian industry.

Delegates from China and India did not back the pledge, which pairs the ramp-up in renewable power with a reduction in fossil fuel use.

– AAP

Brisbane lord mayor quits Olympics forum and criticises government

Tamsin Rose

Tamsin Rose

Brisbane lord mayor, Adrian Schrinner, has said the Palaszczuk government has “completely lost its way” on the road to the Olympics as he quit the Brisbane 2032 Games delivery forum.

The Liberal National mayor has also withdrawn his support for the controversial $2.7bn Gabba rebuild, insisting there must be better options than demolishing and rebuilding the inner city venue.

In a long statement, Schrinner said the intergovernmental leaders’ forum was “a dysfunctional farce” and that “a pointless talkfest established to placate key stakeholders while all the real decisions are made by the state government behind closed doors”.

Here’s some more of his statement:

It’s clear that the games have become more about over-priced stadiums rather than the promise of vital transport solutions.

The state government’s ham-fisted and foolish attempt to extort Brisbane ratepayers for tens of millions of dollars for a new RNA stadium was the final straw.

This truly bizarre approach was undertaken because I had the temerity to back local fans and say Brisbane teams should play in Brisbane while the Gabba is torn down and rebuilt. How utterly absurd.

Welcome

Good morning and welcome to our rolling news coverage on the first Sunday in December. (Yes, that’s right, December).

It’s early but there’s already a bit of news about. Our big supermarkets will face fresh scrutiny with a Senate inquiry to investigate their market power and pricing decisions, amid concerns they have profiteered during an inflationary period marked by fast-rising food costs.

Australia has also signed a pledge at the Cop28 climate summit to triple global renewable energy capacity by 2030. The pledge was signed by 118 nations. Climate change minister, Chris Bowen, said for emissions to go down around the world, a big international push was needed.

And it wouldn’t be the weekend in Australia without a major sporting event. The AFLW grand final begins later today with Brisbane and North Melbourne facing off. My colleague Sarah Burt says it’s set to be one for the ages.

We’ll also bring you the latest political developments. Greens senator Sarah Hanson-Young will be on the ABC’s Insiders program in about 15 minutes.

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